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Jon Bergmann

  • Jon Bergmann posted a new activity comment 1 week, 1 day ago

    Adriane: this looks like a great study. I could also tweet out a link to this forum and see if we could get some more participants.

  • Jon Bergmann posted a new activity comment 2 months ago

    Joe: tell me more about your flipped-mastery class

  • Joe Liaw and Profile picture of Jon BergmannJon Bergmann are now friends 2 months ago

  • Dan Jones and Profile picture of Jon BergmannJon Bergmann are now friends 2 months ago

  • Jon Bergmann‘s profile was updated 2 months ago

  • Jon Bergmann posted a new activity comment 2 months, 1 week ago

    For many, moodle is a great choice–especially schools with budget issues. Thanks Joe for jumping in.

    • You can get Moodle for FREE here:

      http://www.gnomio.com

      and “officially” from Moodle Cloud:

      moodle.com/cloud/

      I am also running a pilot server supporting flipped teachers in partnership with the Illinois Institute of Technology’s School of Applied Technology at (trying to help support teachers that were on the one and only Jerry Overmeyer’s great…[Read more]

  • @Khalid: you are right–great things are happening in Morocco thanks to amazing educators like you. I love how you are involving students in the process. Keep up the amazing and awesome work.

  • Ximena: I like your phrase: “…it can shift the locus of control back to the learner.” Well said. This is one of the principal advantages to the flipped learning approach.

  • By Jon Bergmann and Errol St.Clair Smith

    Pop Quiz: Most educators know about the Socratic method. True or false?

    Let’s go with true.

    But why was Socrates called the wisest man in the world?

    The a […]

    • Excited to read this post, but honestly I’m surprised you didn’t know some of these, Jon. Or maybe it was the motivation which drove you and Aaron to develop the flipped model that caused the myopic view. As I recall in your first book, it was attendance issues which you solved with the videos. I could easily see you saying “great, solved that problem.” What drove me to the flipped model had nothing to do with videos or joining a growing movement. For me it was dissatisfaction with the boring lack of engagement in my traditional lecture-driven science class. I needed students doing science, not listening to me talk. So my first iteration was a flipped model, because it was the only thing I found when I looked for ideas, but I knew early on it was not enough. I hadn’t finished a year when I was in iteration #2, and so it continuted. And this all happened before I even read another book or attended FlipCon, or joined the FLN. It was not long before I was asynchronous, non-linear, student driven, assessment focused, etc. I don’t even call my class “flipped” anymore , as it does conjure up ideas of video at home, homework in class. I think changes will happen organically for the teachers who refuse to settle for anything less than total student-centered learning.

      • Big smile…. Sounds like you’ve done a lot with flipped learning and continue to iterate. BRAVO! I smile because in some ways you sound like us. There is so much that you already know and are doing with flipped learning yet there is so much more below the surface.

    • It’s so exciting to hear of the dynamic growth of flipped learning worldwide. I think every teacher comes to flipped learning with a different angle and so develops flipped learning modalities according to what they see as a need hence the great variety of use. I didn’t use flipped learning as much last year and I missed it so much! I was teaching 6-year-olds (after teaching older ones for a while) with 1:6 devices, but this year I’m team teaching in an ILE with 1:2 devices so I am itching to see how I can help develop self-regulation through flipped learning (not that I only flipped using tech before). One of the main reasons why I use flipped learning is because it can shift the locus of control back to the learner. I quickly learned that this does not mean I get to put my feet up, on the contrary, it demands huge awareness of content development and effective systems to track students in-time so I can help craft lessons that maintain the challenge level. I found that flipped learning shifted my focus from being the pilot of the ‘learning airplane’ to being the air-traffic controller, enabling me to hand the controls over to the students while maintaining high outcomes. I’ll be interested to see how I can use this more with younger students this year.

      Flipped learning relies on innovation to stay dynamic and purposeful (probably another reason why it ticks my box). It’s great to see that its flexibility is helping to create a diverse biosphere of varied flipped ecosystems, all helping partnerships in learning grow.

      • Ximena: I like your phrase: “…it can shift the locus of control back to the learner.” Well said. This is one of the principal advantages to the flipped learning approach.

    • I have been flipping for four years now and also my teachers are do so. What really impress me after the certification is shift from the question: does it work to how it works better. A great number of educators, all over the globe, are adopting the new methodology mindfully and are touching the change in their classes. One of the worth considering points is: the students’ involvement in the learning process: the students excel at IT, some teachers need their students’ assistance. They can provide the teacher with the material and guidance. Hence, students’ instruction in needed and the teachers can flip their kids’ instruction. By doing so, we motivate, engage them and promote brilliant minds to inspire other students. So flip your students’ instruction.
      Jon, you mentioned the countries that are flipping but I could find Morocco listed. Yes, we are and we are doing it very effectively. Thank you flippers and thank you join for your impressive effort.

      • @Khalid: you are right–great things are happening in Morocco thanks to amazing educators like you. I love how you are involving students in the process. Keep up the amazing and awesome work.

  • Teachers are absent from school an average of 9.4 days a year (Education Next 2014) for a variety of reasons: sickness, personal days, and professional learning days. This represents 5.2% of learning time; […]

  • There is nothing more important that student safety. Students identities and personal information MUST be protected. Any tool that does not treat this information as mission critical should be immediately excluded […]

  • Jon Bergmann posted a new activity comment 2 months, 3 weeks ago

    I know some people. Reach out

  • Jon Bergmann posted a new activity comment 2 months, 3 weeks ago

    I know people. Reach out to me via the community and I can help you.

    • Thanks, Jon. I had messaged you via FLGI but I hadn’t heard back from you. Needed at least 3 more to meet my minimum. My chair’s daughter is a tech trainer at York (Elmhurst) and recommended that I contact them, but two rounds of emails and two phone messages have gotten no reply. Anything you could do to help would be beneficial as I need to get…[Read more]

    • I am also having trouble being able to actually read some of the notifications I’m getting here. Email is pulley@unit6.org

  • Jon Bergmann posted a new activity comment 3 months ago

    Tiziana: great video

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