esmith@flglobal.org

The Perfect Match: Common Core and the Flipped Classroom

Flipped learning is when you move the direct instruction from the group learning classroom
to an individual learning space.

Webb, Norman L. and others. “Web Alignment Tool” 24 July 2005. Wisconsin Center of Educational Research. University of Wisconsin-Madison. 2 Feb. 2006.

Webb, Norman L. and others. “Web Alignment Tool” 24 July 2005. Wisconsin Center of Educational Research. University of Wisconsin-Madison. 2 Feb. 2006.

With the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Standards for Science, as well as new assessments right around the corner, schools and districts are wrestling with how to prepare teachers for this change. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are a vehicle to prepare students for college and career readiness.

One key shift is that students will need to provide demonstrable evidence of their knowledge in:

  • New situations,
  • Unrehearsed situations, and
  • More complex situations.

And in the Common Core Math Standards, there is a focus on:

  • Mathematical reasoning
  • Abstract reasoning
  • Use of appropriate tools, especially technological tools
  • Construction of mathematical arguments
  • The understanding of mathematical models

Learning objectives and standards are not new for teachers. They have guided our classroom lessons and tests for a long time, but now teachers need to move their students to deeper levels of understanding. As a former science teacher, I think in terms of charts. Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (DOK) chart maps out four levels of cognitive complexity. The CCSS and Next Generation assessments will emphasize levels three and four, whereas most of our current instruction and assessment focus on levels one and two.

Since I wrote this with Pearson Education you will need to read the rest of the article by clicking HERE:

2 Responses

  1. Carranza

    The four benefits of flipped learning which are differentiation, equity, flexibility, and engagement helps students insure learning take place outside the classroom. As a fourth grade classroom teacher I believe engagement is vital to learning. I also agree with you that students should have a choice on where and when they engage with content. I have one question regarding differentiation. How do I equitably help each learner? I foresee some students asking for help on a daily basis and others will never ask or need assistance.

    1. Profile photo of Jon Bergmann

      Jaime: that is a great question and one I struggled with as I taught my flipped classrooms. I think the key was that I didn’t just let the students choose who got help, but I proactively, chose who got my attention that day. Don’t let just the squeaky wheels get the oil,but rather, go around the room and engage each student with the appropriate amount of time.

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